Huddersfield Train Station

Are you interested in the history of railway stations? Here in Huddersfield is the second busiest station in West Yorkshire “Huddersfield railway station”. It is across the road from Yorkshire English School (YES) where I enjoyed studying English.

The station was designed by the architect James Pigott Pritchett and built by the firm of Joseph Kaye between 1846–1850 in the neoclassical style. The station is well known in architectural circles for its classical-style facade, with a portico of the Corinthian order, consisting of six columns in width and two in depth, which dominates St George’s Square. The station frontage was described by John Betjeman as “the most splendid in England” and by Sir Nikolaus Pevsner as “one of the best early railway stations in England”.

Two pubs are within the station frontage, to each side of the main entrance: The Head Of Steam and The King’s Head (previously known as The Station Tavern). Both facilities are accessible from Platform 1. At the building’s entrance, the booking office is to the left and to the right are the train timetables and a newsagent.

The station connects the following cities;Manchester and Liverpool in the North West and Newcastle and  Middlesbrough in the North East. Huddersfield railway station also connects to York, Scarborough and Hull via Leeds.

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